A Conversation about Connectivity, Data and Reporting

Q: When it comes to fuel management, what is all the fuss about connectivity?

A: For a fuel management system to add real value there needs to be smooth integration the client’s ERP system.

Q: What does that mean?

A: Proper integration ensures that the data interacts seamlessly with ERP systems, which allows clients to manage the efficiency of their fuel usage and fleet management in real-time.

Q: So how does connectivity affect this?

A: The communication between the fuel management system, and the various controllers, relies on some form of effective, real time data transfer to and from the client’s ERP system.

Q: So, connectivity is key to accurate information?

A: Well, not just accuracy, but to have real-time information, this is critical.

Q: Are there any standards or preferences when it comes to connectivity?

A: Not really. While some technologies are challenging and some outperform others, a key aspect is the ability of the fuel management system to integrate with the exiting connectivity platform being used by the client.

Q: Much has been said about the types and volumes of data the Fuel Management Systems can provide. But how important is the integration of the data?

A: Even if the data is accurate and available in real-time, the integration of the data into the client’s ERP system is crucial.

Q: Why is that?

A: You see, without smooth integration the client cannot make informed decisions regarding their resource’s allocation and fuel management. Proper integration ensures that the data interacts seamlessly with ERP systems, which allows clients to manage the efficiency of their fuel usage and fleet management in real-time.

Q: How should this integration take place?

A: This is typically an automated process using push or pull protocols, staging tables or flat files.

Q: What about other analytics engines being used by the client”

A: This is an important point. The Fuel Management System data should integrate with analytics engines such as MII, IFS, etc. as well as third party monitoring systems like tonnage, tracking, etc. Clients want a comprehensive view of all the metrics they need to monitor to efficiently manage their resources.

Q: So, for a fuel management system to add real value there needs to be smooth integration the client’s ERP system?

A: Yes absolutely. It is extremely important for the fuel management system to integrate with the client’s ERP system.

Q: But why is it so crucial?

A: Proper integration ensures that the data interacts seamlessly with ERP systems, which allows clients to receive meaningful reports in real-time.

Q: So, reporting must then be important?

A: Yes exactly. It is important that the fuel management system produces accurate reports regarding all aspects of how all hydrocarbons are being used.

Q: Are these reports all standard?

A: There are typically many standard reports, but customised reports are also essential.

Q: What do you mean?

A: Every fleet owner has specific needs when it comes to reporting. A comprehensive fuel management system must therefore be able to produce accurate reports in real-time which are customised to best suit the needs of individual end-users.

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